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Compare Central Vacuum Systems

When you are looking at a central vacuum it can easily get confusing as to whether or not you are getting the highest quality, best warranty, and the overall best product available for your home. There is a wide range of internal components that vary in terms of quality throughout brands, and this is what distinguishes them from one another. The motor in particular is the most important piece of your built-in vacuum and is the determining factor in how long it will last. To see the different types of motors (cheap vs. high quality) installed in systems you can view our central vacuum reviews page. The warranty should also be a large factor in your purchasing decision. A company that does not stand behind their product should raise a red flag, and companies that do warranty their products for a long time show that they have confidence in the units they are providing.

The other things you should look at when you want to compare central vacuums should be the airwatts, suction in inches h2O, and the airflow of the unit. All of these specifications will range a lot when you are looking at them, and you should know what they represent when considering which unit to purchase. The airwatts of the system come from two other basic measurements, the airflow and inches of H20. Think of it as a simple math equation (though its not very simple). If A=airflow & B=inches H2O, and A+B=C, C would be your total airwatts of the system. Since this measurement is inclusive of your most two important statistics, then it gives the best possible representation of the strength of the central vac and how its going to perform. Do not be fooled though by systems that offer a cheap price and a lot of airwatts. Most often these units use cheap flow-thru motors that only last 5-6 years. It is misleading to compare two systems which show high airwatts, but one is only going to last 1/3 as long as the other. High Quality systems will use an infinity tangential motor which usually last up to 1500 hours of use (normally 20 years worth). The other things you should look at when you want to compare central vacuums should be the airwatts, suction in inches h2O, and the airflow of the unit. All of these specifications will range a lot when you are looking at them, and you should know what they represent when considering which unit to purchase.

The airflow of a system is rated in CFM. CFM stands for cubic feet per minute and represents how fast the air is going to move through a central vacuum tube (and also through your powernozzle). Stronger central vacuums are always going to have a high rating of CFM. An easy way to picture CFM is to think of a thunderstorm coming through compared to a small batch of rain. When the rain comes through it has a slight breeze that will just blow leaves across the ground. When a severe thunderstorm comes through it packs 60-80 mph winds that blow limbs off trees. Just as the wind can range in nature, the suction can range in central vacs. Choose a unit that has a lot of CFM if you want to leave your home clean and healthy for your family.

The Inches of H2O is a measurement of how many inches of water a central vacuum will vertically suction up. Though this is a good representation of how strong the vacuum is, it may be misleading on the overall strength. Inches of H2O & CFM never go hand in hand, and are always opposite of eachother. You may find that two central vacuums that have the same amount of airwatts will have different CFM & airflow levels. Overall you should choose the one that has a best mix of the two, and has the strongest warranty to provide you a no hassle ownership of the product.

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